• Robie Hancock (right) with friend Roy Levy, in Italy, 1945.

 

  • Robie Hancock with a Dutch civilian in Stadskanaal, The Netherlands. At this time, Mr. Hancock was part of the Canadian peacekeeping force, stationed right near the German border. For the photo, Mr. Hancock is wearing a pair of her wooden shoes, while she is wearing his army jacket and beret.

 

  • A letter Robie Hancock sent to his mother in December, 1943 which recovering in hospital near Syracuse, Sicily. Seven men were killed and many more badly wounded, including Mr. Hancock when a large German gun blew up.

 

  • The cover and last page of a letter Robie Hancock sent to his mother in December, 1943 which recovering in hospital near Syracuse, Sicily. Seven men were killed and many more badly wounded, including Mr. Hancock when a large German gun blew up.

 

 

 

 

WHITE ROCK - Robie Hancock spent his last night during the Second World War in a German haymow with his comrade, Joe Elliott.
The next morning, the two soldiers from the Royal Canadian Dragoons were told armistice papers were to be signed and Elliott volunteered to be a signatory. “On his way, he stepped on a landmine,” Hancock said. “If he hadn’t volunteered, it would have been me. It just happened.”

Huge crowds, waving Canadian flags at parades, marked the 70th anniversary of the liberation of Holland recently. But for Hancock, the most meaningful event was finding Elliott’s grave, amongst rows of other young war dead, in the Holten war cemetery. The Ontario native was 23 when he was killed. Hancock had been to previous commemoration events, the last in 2000, but seven decades later, he was happy to lay a flag and a poppy on Elliott’s grave. Now, says daughter Sandra Cudmore, the family would love to make contact with any of Elliott’s relatives.

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